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Archive for June, 2010

This little slime mold was growing this week. It starts out a stunning bubble gum pink, but it doesn’t last. it darkens fast to a chocolate brown and then black. Growing in a colony of rounded structures in this case on a log of poplar wood. Link to notes on flickr.

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All round Abney the full canopy is shading out the undergrowth, but it isn’t enough to stop the heat of the summer from parching the ground and drying the wood. Small pockets of protection from the relentless process will not last. The fungi that started to grow has shriveled and vanished leaving only the year round brackets to bake and shed their spores through to the cool of autumn. The months coming are for the insects and young birds to live and grow and for the visitors to bask on the benches or sit in the dappled shade. If it rains there may be a flourish of growth from the caps that have a quick response time, but the glut of autumnal fungi seems a far distant occasion at the moment. Have a good summer!

Link to June 2010 photos.

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The ash trunk that had so much growth last year is continuing to produce brackets. The lower brackets and side brackets join by a small area of attachment in the side of the bracket directly into the side of the trunk. The top brackets have a short stalk which allows the pore producing lower side to be in a position for gravity to release the spores. The 2 brackets look a bit different.

Link to all fungi photos 2010.

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Saturday the bees were everywhere. A break in the damp overcast conditions had them all feeding. Most were camera shy but I managed to find 3 species of Bumble bee..

Link to all June 2010 photos.

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Abney is becoming very soggy at the moment. Soggy and warm is great for fungi and slime molds. It should start getting interesting very soon.

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Abney Park Cemetery is 32 acres of woodland, with a lot of growth and a lot of woodpiles etc. A casual stroll round a few main pathways is never going to take me to every location for fungus and slime mold growth so I miss a great deal. If you happen to be in Abney and find something interesting it may be that I have missed it, please do let me know. I am horribly bad at finding locations that are described to me, so here’s a link to a map of Abney that can help which is downloadable….

This version of the map is rotated through 90 degrees to view it the right way up.

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Growing on a very wet log, half hidden under ivy, a series of rounded growths are beginning to spread their spores. They were pinkish yesterday, but are more gray today. There are 2 Lycogala species in Abney, the more obvious one is Lycogala epidendrum, which is bright bubble gum pink, and which has gray spores. L. terrestre is a more grey colour but has pink spores.

Link to photographed notes.

Link to P-Z + Slime Molds page.

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There are quite a lot of small round growths in differing colours. These are identified as having grown in Abney in the past so possibly could be growing again. The list is not all that grows, only those I have found and been able to identify. To find more details look on the alphabetical list pages.

1. Acrostalagmus luteoalbus. White/ salmon pink/ orange.  Found in cold weather on old Daldinia concentrica (a larger black roundish fungus). Link to notes.

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2. Bisporella citrina, Lemon Disco. This starts as tiny yellow round growths and becomes saucer shaped. Link to notes.

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3. Dacrymyces stillatus, Common Jellyspot. Orange. Round growths that merge with close adjacent individuals. Link to notes.

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4. Hypomyces aurantius. Orange. Up to 0.2mm across. On old fungi. Link to notes.

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5. Lasiosphaeria spermoides. Black. Up to 0.5mm across. Scattered on wood. Link to notes.

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6. Nectria cinnabarina. Coral Spot. Orange / red. Swarming on wood. Link to notes.

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7. Nectria coccinea. Scarlet. 0.25 mm across. Swarming on wood. Link to notes.

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8. Nectria peziza. Orange. 0.5mm across max. Swarming on wood. On close examination saucer shaped. Link to notes.

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9. Pyronema domesticum. Salmon pink. Roundish, elongated. Growing on soil on bonfire sites. Link to notes.

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10. Rosellinia aquila. Black / White rounds swarming on wood. Close examination shows they have pointed tops. Link to notes.

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11. Lycogala epidendron. Striking pink rounds up to about 3mms across. A slime mold. A link to notes.

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12. Lycogala terrestre. Pinkish grey rounds up to about 3mm across. A slime mold. A link to notes.

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13. Trichia varia. Yellow / Brown rounds to 3mm across. A slime mold. A link to notes.

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Almost on the first of June the roses began flowering.

Link to June Photos of Abney.

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The first of the year. This has just been renamed as Coprinopsis marcescibils. this moves it from the Psathyrellas into the inkcaps. The same has happened to Psathyrella conopilus, which is now Parasola conopilus, another inkcap.

Link to my fungus notes on Coprinopsis  marcescibilis.

Link to Fungus Photos 2010.

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