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Archive for August, 2011

This grows in sometimes large groups and sometimes just a handful of caps together, but rarely just one. The caps are initially rusty, tan coloured, but the edge fades to a paler, radially striated edge, later on this can be half the radius. The paling does depend on age and drying conditions. The stem is initially quite pale with a tan flush in the base, and later the base can be asĀ  densely rusty as the cap center and fade a little below the cap.

Link to species notes.

 

 

 

 

Link to photos of fungi and slime molds 2011.

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I managed to get in a muddle with these 2 species. Polyporus leptocephalus is yellow/brown, with a central stem and a black end to a more graceful stem. Polyporus durus is darker brown with an eccentric stemĀ  which is shorter and wider, also blacker for what tends to be along the whole stem. They both grow on rotting wood, willow, elm and beech for leptocephalus, elm ash and sycamore for durus. Durus is bigger with a shinier cap. My thanks to Justin and Pat at Londonfungi for sorting me out.

At the moment P. durus is up and lovely.

As a comparison a photo of Polypore leptocephalus is on the left.

Link to species notes for Polyporus durus.

Link to speceis notes for Polyporus leptocephalus.

Link to photos of fungi and slime mold 2011.

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Well it would have to have been a pretty big dog! This is a big slime mold, or it can be. It lives in wood and feeds until it decides to produce spores, then it moves to the surface of the wood and it has been described as scrambled egg. It seems to me more like a yellow sponge which can become reddish depending on maturity and conditions. It an be extensive and, against the wood chips that I usually find it on, it does stand out a lot. And it moves slightly into the bast place it can find, leaving a trail of white-ish strands behind it as it goes. It moves very slowly, so only after a few hours do you see the diffeence. Not the most elegant in appearance, but interesting none the less.

Link to species notes.

Link to photos of Fungi and SLime molds 2011.

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After the torrential rain of yesterday the wood chip pile had a small cluster of P. leiocephala. The caps have a distinctive shape. The young caps are brown and they slowly fade to grey. The oval of young capsgrows to a ridged hemispherical shape, the dips in the ridges being darker grey. They end up flattish. The central disc remains brown although it can be pale. The stem is equal and bald.

Link to species notes.

Link to photos of fungi and slime molds in Abney Park Cemetery 2011.

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The last time this species grew in Abney it had the potential to be a lot larger then this time, (it didn’t achieve any grand size as the squirrels ate them first). This time the caps are more taditional. They are growing on a wood chip/leaf mound that is hotly decomposing. It is also covered in thousands of mites which are hard to remove. It is a huge relief that the microscopic and macroscopic features are all exactly right. In inkcaps this is a rare occurance.

Link to species notes.

Link to photos of fungi and slime molds 2011.

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This year the sparrowhawks have raised 3 chicks and they are now fledging. They are flying over the tree tops calling to each other, and they sound exactly like a squeeky toy that my dogs used to play with. Each of the chicks calls on a slightly different pitch and one of them is a little less noisy then the other 2. The chicks first flew from their nest at the beginning of last week. The parents are still around , but the chicks have to learn to hunt quickly now. The number of small birds about in Abney at the moment is at its highest. Robins in particular seem to be very numerous. They are now likely to be lunch.

Link to photos of Abney Park Cemetery August 2011.

Link to photos of birds in Abney Park Cemetery.

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This wonderfully evokative name for a fungus in a cemetery, describes the shape and colour of the fungus growth. It grows on dead decaying wood which can be burried. The form is supposed to resemble finger tips. They have a narrow point of attachment to the wood and swell out above it. The black surface is finely textured, covered with pores opening out from the layer just below the surface, where chambers are producing the spores. The spores are fired out when the conditions are right.

The sight of the black swollen fingerlike projections coming up out of grass in a cemetery would be interesting to come accross. Unfortunately I have not seen this in Abney Park, there is not much grass about. It grows instead on decaying wood as here….

Link to species notes.

Link to photos of fungi and slime molds in Abney Park Cemetery 2011

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