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Archive for November, 2012

From the top this looks a pale bracket with a green covering of algae. There are lines of brown peeking through the green fibrous/hairy surface, but it could be several different species…. right until I picked one and turned it over. The underside is a wonderful violet near the edge, and it fades to a brown near the wood. Tiers of this small, thin bracket were on a wood pile of Bhutan Pine wood. That underside violet with pores can only be Trichaptum abietinum. I don’t know how long it has been there, I may well have overlooked it before and the wood has been there for a few years, but this is the first time it has been identified in Abney Park.

Link to species notes

Link to photos of fungi and slime mold 2012

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Cortinarius hinnuleus

This is the first time I have seen this and I am grateful to Justin (Londonfungi) for his help with this. It was growing under hawthorn and oak recently. The cap was radially fibrous, silky smooth and shiny when hydrated. It was a pale orange-yellow colour when dry and darkened to a rich chocolate-brown when hydrated. The gills began the same pale orange-yellow as the cap, but became brighter as they matured. The stem was sinuous and tapered slightly downwards. The veil remnants on the stem and minute wispy fibers on the cap, were whitish. The veil makes it a Cortinarius, as does the microscopic structure.

Link to species notes

Link to photos of fungi and slime molds 2012

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I thought this had been recorded in Abney a long time ago, but no. When I found this cap I realised the previous identification was wrong, but this is correct. I am grateful to the Londonfungi guys who helped me out here. It is a tricky area that seems to be still evolving. The cap is short and stout and smells sweet. The cap is a pale tan colour with a white edge. The identification really needs a microscope. There are other caps in Abney Park that look exactly the same but the microscopic details don’t match, and as yet they are unidentified.

Link to species notes

Link to photos of fungi and slime molds 2012.

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It’s a while ago now, on 11.11.2012, that these were growing. They are the youngest caps of Coprinopsis marcescibilis that I have seen, and worthy of noting here. The veil is still breaking on the cap edges and the stems are covered with scales, which is a fleeting phase in their appearance. I’ve updated the species notes and added them to the annual photos of fungus and slime molds.

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I’ve gone a bit overboard taking photos of Abney at the moment. The cemetery looks stunning. The ash trees in the north area have already lost most of their leaves and looked like ghosts this morning, looming in the fog. A lot of other trees are still at their best. It will not last a lot longer, but until the change of weather I can recommend a walk through. (There are more photos here).

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The colour of caps changes with age. Some darken and some fade. This is one that fades dramatically. I was sent a photo by Kirsten (think you for sending it over to me Kirsten!) who was amazed by the colour, and it is worth putting up here as I have never seen it this colour, even though it appears like this in some of my books. I usually find it faded to a grey/lilac colour or even when it has lost the blue/lilac completely and developed a rosy tinge. The speed of this change took me by surprise.

Link to species notes.

Link to photos of fungi and slime molds 2012.

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There are 3 Agaricus species in Abney at the moment. Agaricus is the most recognisable group from it being sold so widely in grocer. The pink gills that darken to chocolate-brown, the ring on the stem and the creamy white surface are all distinctive.  The most common Agaricus in Abney is a yellow stainer, Agaricus xanthodermus. Usually it is exactly like the shop bought caps, apart from the tendency to bruise yellow, usually seen by scratching the surface. The bright chrome yellow colour that it can produce is diluted by rain, but is always there. The chemical type of smell is faint. This time I’ve found a cap with a grey/brown surface that breaks into scales. It is still a yellow stainer, but a slightly different appearance.

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Another Agaricus at the moment is A. molleri. The cap initially has fibrils on the surface that are the same cream/white as the cap, but withy age they become dark grey. It may be down to a hand lens to see them. The really different feature about them is when they are cut they develop a strong inky/ iodine like smell. It takes a while to come through, but once smelt it is unmistakable. When cut, also, it goes mildly yellow in the base and cap, but it fades to slightly more reddish and areas of the flesh tends to go grey.

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The third Agaricus at the moment is A. osecanus. I had most trouble with this one. The ring is different to the other 2 in having a fibrous inner link from the ring to the stem. The cap surface is a smooth creamy white. Now I have got that I think I will always be able to get this species via a mirror without picking it.

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Link to species notes for Agaricus xanthodermus.

Link to species notes for Agaricus molleri.

Link to species notes for Agaricus osecanus.

Link to photos of fungi and slime molds 2012.

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